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Meridiani | Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Francesco Arena, Chiara Camoni

23 February 2018

Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Torino-Guarene, azione: cammino di 58km da Torino a Guarene, 2008. Courtesy: Collezione FRAC Piemonte, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Torino-Guarene, azione: cammino di 58km da Torino a Guarene, 2008. Courtesy: Collezione FRAC Piemonte, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin Chiara Camoni, Tra cielo e terra on-site visit, February 2018 Chiara Camoni, Tra cielo e terra on-site visit, February 2018 Chiara Camoni, Tra cielo e terra on-site visit, February 2018 Chiara Camoni, Tra cielo e terra on-site visit, February 2018 Francesco Arena, Novantatremiliardi di albe, 2016 Francesco Arena, Posatoi, 2014 Francesco Arena, Posatoi, 2014

Nomas Foundation is pleased to announce that the project Meridiani, supported by her affiliated society, GIA srl, is among the winner of the grant Arte sui Cammini. The initiative, issued by Regione Lazio, is devoted to the valorisation of the regional path of the Francigena Ways, through the realization of artworks.
Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Francesco Arena and Chiara Camoni develop Meridiani in three different artistic forms. Those artists, interpreting the theme of the path, produce new narrations about the sense of time and space, and about human relationships, civil life, common and individual consciousness, history stratification.

Untitled (Gloria), by Giorgio Andreotta Calò is a work divided in three different but complementary parts: first, a journey made by the artist during the course of a month – alone and by foot – from Venice to Amatrice; then a tangible sign of this path left to Leonessa, on the traditional Way of Saint Benedict; and, at last, an artist’s book.
The route will wind from north to south, ideally following a portion of the Faglia Gloria, the fracture where the European and African plates meet, which crosses a large part of Italy and is responsible for the telluric events that often affect the Peninsula, as well as the morphogenesis of this territory and, indirectly, of its anthropological and cultural peculiarities.
Giorgio Andreotta Calò’s path retraces backwards in the direction of transmission of seismic waves, in an attempt to give life to a ritual, apotropaic, personal and collective action that reflects on the states of crisis generated by the earthquake.
Choosing Venice as a symbolic starting point, his hometown and place from where he felt the earthquake of August 24th 2016, he heads towards its epicentre.
Perception of precariousness, sense of living and reconstruction of a community: these are the reflections that animate the path.
The notion of motus, movement, is then investigated and translated through the gesture of walking but at the same time in reference to terrae motus, up to that motion of the spirit, tied to the demands and urgencies of the present.

Monolith divided and distant by Francesco Arena is a monolithic sculpture in white bronze divided in two parts, located at 113 km from each other, along the Via Francigena of southern Lazio, between Lago di Giulianello and Fondi. The distance indicated is the one that separates the Tunisian coast from the island of Lampedusa. The work intends to create a connection between two different contexts and places: the real place in which the work is installed, a path walked by thousands of pilgrims and believers throughout the centuries; and the “route” through the Mediterranean Sea, traversed today by thousands of men and women – new pilgrims of history – in search of better living conditions.
The Vie Francigene, which connect northern Europe to southern Italy, thus come into contact with a reverse route, which from south goes northwards, from Africa to Lampedusa, first piece of European land. Both are paths of research, faith, hope and desperation.
The work is a sort of milestone that marks these two distances, a monolith divided in two parts by a cut and a rip, a trauma that embodies the historical contemporary drama of migration.

Between land and sky by Chiara Camoni is a passing place for travellers on foot or by horse, designed as a resting space and a place devoted to observation and reflection along the northern Via Francigena. This area, close to the lake of Bolsena, is conceived as a useful and non-invasive basement in local stone, equipped with a fountain with two basins for offering water to travellers and animals, and a large oak planted ex novo for the occasion to provide shade. The choice of the artist falls on simple elements, made from traditional materials, because these require the same time/duration needed by the path of the via Francigena. The spiritual dimension of the step-by-step – human or animal – is the same of the “gesture that follows gesture” in the action of the sculpting hand.
Between land and sky is a monument to the beauty of the Italian landscape, an invitation to re-appropriate oneself of the time and space imposed by walking (a strong metaphor of the serial dimension), an anthropic space which dialogues with nature.


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